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Heartworm In Dogs – Diagnosis and Treatment

Heartworm In Dogs – Diagnosis and Treatment

In a previous post, we went over the basics of heartworm in dogs: what it is, how it’s transmitted by mosquitoes, plus we covered the various symptoms and stages of the disease. Now let’s look at how heartworm disease is diagnosed and treated. Then we will look at how heartworm can be prevented. Diagnosis of heartworm in its earlier stages is very important because the earlier it’s detected the better your dog’s chances are for a complete recovery. Heartworm disease is diagnosed by a blood test which looks for something called antigens in your dog’s blood. These antigens are proteins…
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Heartworm In Dogs – What You Must Know

Heartworm In Dogs – What You Must Know

The very name of the ugly disease tells it all...heartworm...an infestation of parasitic worms that get into your dog’s heart and are transmitted through the bite of the mosquito. Yuck! Here’s what you need to know to protect your dog. Years ago, it was a common practice to give heartworm medication to dogs in just the warmer months when mosquitoes were out and about, especially in the Northern U.S. where winter temps presumably took away all risk for infection.  And yes, the Southern regions of the U.S. have long been associated with the disease, but now heartworm has been reported…
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Can Dogs Get Poison Ivy?

Can Dogs Get Poison Ivy?

With summer here and poision ivy everywhere, even growing in urban and suburban environments, here’s what you need to know about this poisonous plant and your dog. Poision ivy, identified by its “leaves of three” contains an oil called urushiol, which causes most humans to break out in an unbearably itchy oozing red rash.  So, can your dog get poision ivy too? The bad news is yes she can. But the good news is that it doesn't happen very often. For most dogs, the skin is protected by their fur from oil. But, if you have a dog with very…
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Why Do Dogs’ Eyes Look So Sad?

Why Do Dogs’ Eyes Look So Sad?

A fascinating study published in 2019 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that the facial muscles of our canine companions may have evolved to be able to better communicate with humans. This explains how dogs can tug on human heartstrings by giving people that “adopt me please” look. This study found that domestic dogs’ faces are structured in such a way that complex expressions are possible. This same ability is not found in wolves.  This suggests that because dogs coevolved with humans over tens of thousands of years, that they developed a special ability to communicate…
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Which Dog Breeds Are Most At Risk From The Summer Heat?

Which Dog Breeds Are Most At Risk From The Summer Heat?

Here at the WoofPost, we’ve talked about protecting your dog from hot weather and the dangers of heatstroke, but some dog breeds are more susceptible to heat injury than others.  Make no mistake, all dogs are subject to overheating, heat exhaustion and heatstroke if the conditions are right. Heatstroke and heat exhaustion can lead to cardiac arrest and death.  But there are some breeds that just don’t do as well in the heat as others do. Dogs with very thick coats and long hair generally are more prone to heat injury than others. These breeds include the Alaskan Malamute, Siberian…
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Dog Insomnia May Be Due To Stress

Dog Insomnia May Be Due To Stress

Dogs are a lot like humans. If you’ve had a stressful day, it’s likely that your sleep that night won’t be the greatest. But not much research has been done on canines and the effect of stress on their sleep. A study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B looked at the sleep quality of 16 adult dogs after they had either a positive or negative experience. The dogs that participated in the study were retrievers, vizslas, and mixed breed dogs.  The positive experience consisted of six minutes of tug of war, playing fetch or being petted…
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Current FDA And CDC COVID Social Distancing Guidelines For Dogs

Current FDA And CDC COVID Social Distancing Guidelines For Dogs

June 18, 2020 - According to both the CDC (Centers For Disease Control) and the FDA (Federal Drug Administration) when walking your dog, you should apply the six foot social distancing rule to your canine companions as well as yourself. Both agency guidelines go on to say that there is a small, but real risk that people with COVID-19 could spread the virus to their dog or any dog with which they had close contact. It’s not yet clear if the dog could then infect other dogs and people.  The current recommendations state you should not let your dog interact…
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Can Dogs Get Sunburned?

Can Dogs Get Sunburned?

The short answer is yes they can. Here’s what you need to know: The majority of dog owners know they have to provide adequate water and also keep their dog from overheating in the hot summer months. But many owners don’t think about the risk of sunburn to their dogs, probably because their dog is covered with hair and they believe that protects them. Dogs that have white or very light skin are more susceptible to a sunburn. And a dog’s skin is just like human skin in that it’s just as likely to become damaged and then at greater…
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How To Tell If Your Dog Is In Pain

How To Tell If Your Dog Is In Pain

Many times, it’s really hard to tell if your dog might be in pain. Unless he’s gotten into some sort of accident or sustained visible trauma, you may not realize he’s hurting. No one wants to see their dog suffer, so it’s good to know the signs of pain in your dog. Dog’s are not like humans. Unless they are in severe pain, they don’t complain. The first thing you need to do is reflect on what is “normal” for your dog. What is his appetite usually like, his sleeping and play habits, his disposition and so forth. Often, pain…
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What To Do If Your Dog Is Stung By A Bee

What To Do If Your Dog Is Stung By A Bee

Our canine companions are at risk for bee stings as they are naturally curious and will chase after anything that moves, including insects. Bees are no exception. Most of the time, a bee sting is just a rather painful, but ultimately minor irritation for a dog. Stings can be dangerous for your dog if he’s stung multiple times or in the mouth or throat, as swelling can occur and potentially obstruct his airway. These stings need the attention of a veterinarian. Most commonly, it’s either a bee or wasp that has stung your dog. Bees have a barbed stinger, which…
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